Skip to main content

Events > 2017


The End of Romanticism: Caitlin Hulcup & Lada Valesová

20 October 2017, 13:10


Lunchtime Recital

Lunchtime


Thumbnail of Holywell Music Room

Holywell Music Room

Holywell St
Oxford
OX1 3BN



This programme features songs from the very height of Romanticism: richly tonal early Schoenberg, Berg’s Seven Early Songs and songs by Zemlinsky and Korngold. Mezzo Caitlin Hulcup, recently described as ‘magnificent’ by the Guardian, and pianist Lada Valešová also include a handful of songs by Egon Wellesz, an Austrian Jewish émigré composer who settled in Oxford in 1938, becoming a fellow of Lincoln College and a major influence on the study of music in the city.


Artist Portrait

Caitlin Hulcup

Caitlin Hulcup

Mezzo soprano

Australian born mezzo soprano Caitlin Hulcup regularly appears in oratorio, concert and recital. Her operatic repertoire features major roles by Händel, Mozart, Rossini and Richard Strauss. She made her European debut at the Wiener Staatsoper in 2004 with Enriquetta/I Puritani and has since appeared at leading opera houses internationally, including Bolshoi Theatre Moscow, Deutsche Staatsoper Berlin, Theater an der Wien, Maggio Musicale Fiorentino, Bayerisches Staatsoper Munich and Palau de les Arts Valencia and for Royal Opera House Co... Read Full Biography
Artist Portrait

Lada Valešová

Lada Valešová

Pianist

Lada Valešová’s debut CD of Czech Piano Music Intimate Studies, followed by her second album Dumka on Avie Records label have received universal international critical acclaim. Half Czech and half Russian, and having lived and worked in London for the last twenty years, Lada enjoys exploring and presenting to the public lesser known repertoire with Slavic and middle European links. Her latest CD Fata Morgana: Song by Pavel Haas has been released in March 2017 on Resonus Classics label, and chosen to be a CD of the Mont... Read Full Biography

This event is part of a series:

The Last of the Romantics - Mahler and fin-de-siècle Vienna

Please click here to view the full Festival brochure.    Vienna at the turn of the twentieth century was a vibrant melting pot for music and the arts. Whirling waltzes sat alongside gargantuan symphonies. The height of romanticism had been reached but was nearly exhausted and on the brink of a whole new musical language. Tradition - with Brahms a holder of the torch - ...