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L'origine de la harpe (The Origin of the Harp)

L'origine de la harpe (The Origin of the Harp)

Cette Harpe chérie, à te chanter fidèle,
Était une Sirène, à la voix douce et belle.
On l'entendait au fond des eaux;
Aux approches du soir, glissent sur le rivage,
Elle venait chercher, couverte d'un nuage,
Son amant parmi les roseaux.
Hélas! elle aimait seule, et ses larmes brillantes
Baignèrent bien des nuits ses tresses ondoyantes,
Doux trésors à l'amour si chers.
Mais une flamme pure au Ciel est précieuse.
Il transforma soudain en Harpe harmonieuse
La plaintive vierge des mers. En contours gracieux.
Tout son corps se balance;
Sur sa joue on croit voir un rayon d'éspérance,
Et son sein palpiter encor.
Ses cheveux, dégagés du flot qui les inonde,
Recouvrent ses bras blancs qui ne fendront plus l'onde
Et deviennent des cordes d'or.
Aussi pendant longtemps cette Harpe chérie
Disait-elle à la fois la sombre rêverie,
Et d'amour les plaisirs discrets.
Elle soupire encor la joie et la tristesse:
Quand je suis près de toi, les accords d'allégresse;
Loin de toi, le chant des regrets.
Based on Thomas Moore's poem in English

L'origine de la harpe (The Origin of the Harp)

'Tis believed that this Harp, which I wake now for thee
Was a Siren of old, who sung under the sea;
And who often, at eve, through the bright waters roved,
To meet, on the green shore, a youth whom she loved.
But she loved him in vain, for he left her to weep,
And in tears, all the night, her gold tresses to steep,
Till heaven look'd with pity on true-love so warm,
And changed to this soft Harp the sea-maiden's form.
Still her bosom rose fair — still her cheeks smiled the same -
While her sea-beauties gracefully form'd the light
And her hair, as, let loose, o'er her white arm it fell,
Was changed to bright chords uttering melody's spell.
Hence it came, that this soft Harp so long hath been known
To mingle love's language with sorrow's sad tone;
Till thou didst divide them, and teach the fond lay
To speak love when I'm near thee, and grief when away.

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Composer

Louis-Hector Berlioz (11 December 1803 – 8 March 1869) was a French Romantic composer. His output includes orchestral works such as the Symphonie fantastique and Harold in Italy, choral pieces including the Requiem and L'Enfance du Christ, his three operas Benvenuto Cellini, Les Troyens and Béatrice et Bénédict, and works of hybrid genres such as the "dramatic symphony" Roméo et Juliette and the "dramatic legend" La Damnation de Faust.

The elder son of a provincial doctor, Berlioz was expected to follow his father into medicine, and he attended a Parisian medical college before defying his family by taking up music as a profession. His independence of mind and refusal to follow traditional rules and formulas put him at odds with the conservative musical establishment of Paris. He briefly moderated his style sufficiently to win France's premier music prize, the Prix de Rome, in 1830 but he learned little from the academics of the Paris Conservatoire. Opinion was divided for many years between those who thought him an original genius and those who viewed his music as lacking in form and coherence.

Information from Wikipedia. For the full article, please click here.


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Poet


Poet

Thomas Moore was an Irish poet, singer, songwriter, and entertainer, now best remembered for the lyrics of "The Minstrel Boy" and "The Last Rose of Summer". He was responsible, with John Murray, for burning Lord Byron's memoirs after his death. In his lifetime he was often referred to as Anacreon Moore.

Thomas Moore was born at 12 Aungier Street in Dublin, Ireland over his father's grocery shop, his father being from the Kerry Gaeltacht and his mother, Anastasia Codd, from Wexford. He had two younger sisters, Kate and Ellen.

From a relatively early age Moore showed an interest in music and other performing arts. He sometimes appeared in musical plays with his friends, such as The Poor Soldier by John O'Keeffe (music by William Shield), and at one point had ambitions to become an actor. Moore attended several Dublin schools including Samuel Whyte's English Grammar School in Grafton Street where he learned the English accent with which he spoke for the rest of his life. In 1795 he graduated from Trinity College, which had recently allowed entry to Catholic students, in an effort to fulfill his mother's dream of him becoming a lawyer. Moore was initially a good student, but he later put less effort into his studies. His time at Trinity came amidst the ongoing turmoil following the French Revolution, and a number of his fellow students such as Robert Emmet were supporters of the United Irishmen movement, although Moore himself never was a member. This movement sought support from the French government to launch a revolution in Ireland. In 1798 a rebellion broke out followed by a French invasion, neither of which succeeded.

Besides Emmet, another formative influence was Edward Hudson, also a fellow student at Trinity College, who played a crucial role in introducing Moore to Edward Bunting's A General Collection of the Ancient Irish Music (1797), later one the main sources of his own collection of Irish Melodies.

Taken from Wikipedia. To view the full article, please click here.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Moore


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