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Zwei Venetianische Lieder I „Leis’ rudern hier!“ (1840) Op.25 no.17


Part of a series or song cycle:

Myrthen (Op.25)


Zwei Venetianische Lieder I „Leis’ rudern hier!“

Leis’ rudern hier, mein Gondolier! die Flut vom Ruder sprühn
So leise lass, dass sie uns nur vernimmt, zu der wir zieh’n!
O könnte, wie er schauen kann, der Himmel reden traun,
Er spräche Vieles wohl von dem, was Nachts die Sterne schau’n!
Nun rasten hier, mein Gondolier. Ins Boot die Ruder! Sacht!
Auf zum Balkone schwing’ ich mich, doch du hältst unten Wacht.
O wollten halb so eifrig nur dem Himmel wir uns weih’n,
Als schöner Weiber Diensten traun – wir könnten Engel sein!

Two Venetian Airs I "Row gently here"

Row gently here, my gondolier, ply the water gently,
So that only she, to whom we glide, shall hear us coming!
Oh, if only heaven could speak as it can see,
It would tell much about what the stars discern at night!
Now stay here, my gondolier, gently into the boat with your oar!
While I climb the balcony, you keep watch beneath.
Oh, if we devoted ourselves to heaven half as eagerly
As we seek favours of fair women, we could be angels!
Translations by Richard Stokes, author of The Book of Lieder (Faber, 2005)

Composer

Robert Schumann was a German composer and influential music critic. He is widely regarded as one of the greatest composers of the Romantic era. Schumann left the study of law, intending to pursue a career as a virtuoso pianist. He had been assured by his teacher Friedrich Wieck that he could become the finest pianist in Europe, but a hand injury ended this dream. Schumann then focused his musical energies on composing.

Schumann's published compositions were written exclusively for the piano until 1840; he later composed works for piano and orchestra; many Lieder (songs for voice and piano); four symphonies; an opera; and other orchestral, choral, and chamber works. Works such as KinderszenenAlbum für die JugendBlumenstück, the Sonatas and Albumblätter are among his most famous. His writings about music appeared mostly in the Neue Zeitschrift für Musik (New Journal for Music), a Leipzig-based publication which he jointly founded.

In 1840, Schumann married Friedrich Wieck's daughter Clara, against the wishes of her father, following a long and acrimonious legal battle, which found in favor of Clara and Robert. Clara also composed music and had a considerable concert career as a pianist, the earnings from which formed a substantial part of her father's fortune.

Schumann suffered from a lifelong mental disorder, first manifesting itself in 1833 as a severe melancholic depressive episode, which recurred several times alternating with phases of ‘exaltation’ and increasingly also delusional ideas of being poisoned or threatened with metallic items. After a suicide attempt in 1854, Schumann was admitted to amental asylum, at his own request, in Endenich near Bonn. Diagnosed with "psychotic melancholia", Schumann died two years later in 1856 without having recovered from his mental illness.

Taken from wikipedia. To read the rest of the article, please click here.


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Poet


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Thomas Moore was an Irish poet, singer, songwriter, and entertainer, now best remembered for the lyrics of "The Minstrel Boy" and "The Last Rose of Summer". He was responsible, with John Murray, for burning Lord Byron's memoirs after his death. In his lifetime he was often referred to as Anacreon Moore.

Thomas Moore was born at 12 Aungier Street in Dublin, Ireland over his father's grocery shop, his father being from the Kerry Gaeltacht and his mother, Anastasia Codd, from Wexford. He had two younger sisters, Kate and Ellen.

From a relatively early age Moore showed an interest in music and other performing arts. He sometimes appeared in musical plays with his friends, such as The Poor Soldier by John O'Keeffe (music by William Shield), and at one point had ambitions to become an actor. Moore attended several Dublin schools including Samuel Whyte's English Grammar School in Grafton Street where he learned the English accent with which he spoke for the rest of his life. In 1795 he graduated from Trinity College, which had recently allowed entry to Catholic students, in an effort to fulfill his mother's dream of him becoming a lawyer. Moore was initially a good student, but he later put less effort into his studies. His time at Trinity came amidst the ongoing turmoil following the French Revolution, and a number of his fellow students such as Robert Emmet were supporters of the United Irishmen movement, although Moore himself never was a member. This movement sought support from the French government to launch a revolution in Ireland. In 1798 a rebellion broke out followed by a French invasion, neither of which succeeded.

Besides Emmet, another formative influence was Edward Hudson, also a fellow student at Trinity College, who played a crucial role in introducing Moore to Edward Bunting's A General Collection of the Ancient Irish Music (1797), later one the main sources of his own collection of Irish Melodies.

Taken from Wikipedia. To view the full article, please click here.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Moore


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